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FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions about all Coconut Oils

  1. What are the differences between all your coconut oils?
  2. How much coconut oil should one ingest daily to receive its benefits?
  3. Are there “side effects” to coconut oil?
  4. How does one use coconut oil?
  5. Does coconut oil need to be kept in the refrigerator, and how long does it last?
  6. Is coconut oil a liquid or solid?
  7. What specific nutrients are present in coconut oil?
  8. Do you offer coconut oil in a capsule?
  9. What is the amount of Omega 3 fatty acids in Coconut Oil?
  10. Is Coconut Oil safe for pregnant women?
  11. What is “Extra Virgin Coconut Oil”?
  12. Will cooking with Coconut Oil cause it to become hydrogenated and toxic like hydrogenated oils?
  13. Where can I buy coconut oil?
  14. What is "Liquid Coconut Oil" or "MCT oil"?

Questions about Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil

  1. What is Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil?
  2. Is your Gold Label Virgin Coconut oil organic?
  3. How is Virgin Coconut Oil different from other coconut oils found in stores?
  4. Since farmers and families make your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil, are sanitary conditions in processing a concern?
  5. What is the Lauric Acid content of your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil?
  6. Is your coconut oil heated in its processing?
  7. Is Virgin Coconut Oil destroyed by heat? What about enzymes?
  8. Is your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil sold under another brand?
  9. Are there customer reviews for your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil Brand?

Questions about Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil

  1. What is Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil?
  2. How is Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil different from your Traditional Virgin Coconut Oil?

Questions about Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil

  1. What is “Expeller-Pressed” Coconut Oil (EPCO)?
  2. Are the Nutrient Benefits of EPCO the same as VCNO?

Questions about Coconut Cream Concentrate, Dried Coconut, and Fresh Coconut

  1. Does one get the same benefits with Coconut Cream Concentrate as coconut oil?
  2. How does one mix the coconut oil that has separated back into the Coconut Cream Concentrate?
  3. Can one get the same benefits by eating fresh (or dried) whole coconut?
  4. What are the differences between coconut milk/cream and Coconut Cream Concentrate?
  5. What temperature is your dried coconut dried at? Is your dried coconut considered “raw”?
  6. Are coconuts a nut, fruit, or vegetable?
  7. Do you sell young coconuts?
  8. Do you sell coconut milk?
  9. Do you sell coconut palm sugar?

Questions about Pastured Poultry and Cocofeed

  1. Do you sell your Cocofeed?
  2. Why do your pastured chickens cost so much compared to other chickens?

Questions about Coconut Oil

1. What are the differences between all your Coconut Oils?

Complete answers are given below, but here is a simple chart giving the main differences.

 
Expeller-pressed Coconut Oils
Virgin Coconut Oils
 
Qualities
Pure
Coconut Oil
Organic Expeller-pressed Coconut Oil
Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil
Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil
Non-GMO
No hydrogenation or trans fats
No chemical solvents used in processing
High MCTs/Lauric Acid
USDA Certified Organic
Scent and taste of coconuts
Made from fresh coconuts
No refining
Hand-made, not machine-made
Small batches - family producers
Wet-milling, highest levels of anti-oxidants

Click here to read how all of our different coconut oils can be used in recipes.

2. How much coconut oil should one ingest daily to receive its benefits?

The benefits of coconut oil are mainly from the nutrient value of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs). The best comparison in nature as to the percentage of MCFAs being consumed in a diet is human breast milk. To equal the amount of MCFAs a nursing infant would receive in one day, an adult would need to consume about 3.5 tablespoons of coconut oil a day according to researchers. Since coconut oil in nature is packaged inside the coconut meat, it is recommended to take this amount throughout the day with food high in fiber and protein. However, for those not used to coconut oil in their diet, it is best to start out with an amount far less than this first, to see how your body reacts.

3. Are there “side effects” to Coconut Oil?

Coconut oil is a food, not a medication, and therefore it does not have “side effects.” Since individuals vary, there could be adverse reactions, especially if your body is used to a low-fat diet regimen. The most common reaction is diarrhea. While 3.5 Tbsp. is recommended as the daily intake by some researchers, it is probably best not to start with that amount, or eat it all at once. Spread it out over the course of the day, and reduce the amount you ingest if there are unwanted effects. Like any food, some people could possibly have allergic reactions to coconut oil as well, although it does NOT contain any appreciable amounts of protein as the meat of the coconut would, and most food allergies are related to proteins. Traditionally coconut oil has nourished millions, if not billions, of people throughout Asia for thousands of years.

4. What are the uses of Coconut Oil?

There are many uses of coconut oil and many ways to incorporate it into one’s diet. Since it is a stable cooking oil, one can simply replace unhealthy oils in their diet with coconut oil. Since it is a solid most of the time at room temperature or when refrigerated, it can be a butter or margarine substitute for spreads or for baking. Any recipe calling for butter, margarine, or any other oil can be substituted for coconut oil. It is popularly mixed in with “smoothies.” Many people do eat it simply by the spoon full. If you refrigerate or freeze Virgin Coconut Oils the taste changes completely, and some describe it like a “candy” or “white chocolate.” Some people fill up ice cube trays with coconut oil and then store them in the freezer. Some people use it as a spread, and a lot of people put it into their coffee or tea. There are also hundreds of FREE coconut oil recipes here that have been submitted by our customers over the years. More uses of coconut oil here.

5. Does Coconut Oil need to be kept in the refrigerator, and how long does it last?

No, coconut oil does not need to be kept in the refrigerator. In the Philippines and other tropical climates, where the ambiance air temperature is much higher than North America, people traditionally have not refrigerated coconut oil. Virgin Coconut oil is very stable since it is unrefined and mostly saturated. The expiration dates on our Virgin Coconut Oils are for two years, and on our Expeller-pressed coconut oils they are 18 months, but they will usually be fine much longer than the expiration dates. We do recommend you store the oil out of direct sunlight. In the tropics coconut oil is almost always a liquid, since it’s melting point is about 76 degrees F. In North America it will usually be a solid, butter-like consistency. It can be stored in either form.

6. Is Coconut Oil a liquid or a solid?

Coconut oil is liquid above 75 degrees F. (25 C.), and below that it will be a solid fat. It can be stored in either form, and it can be liquefied easily by applying low level heat.

7. What specific nutrients are present in Coconut Oil?

The best place to look up the nutrient data of coconut oil, including fatty acid analysis, is in the USDA database here. Just type in “coconut oil” into the search box, and then choose “Vegetable oil, coconut” and choose the amount you want to analyze.

Note that this analysis is probably for refined coconut oil. Virgin coconut oils contain more antioxidants. More info.

8. Do you offer coconut oil in a capsule?

See our complete answer to this question here.

9. What is the amount of Omega 3 fatty acids in Coconut Oil?

None. Coconut oil is not a source of Omega 3 fatty acids. These need to be supplemented in the diet from elsewhere (such as our Cod Liver Oil). The primary benefits of coconut oil are the nutritive value of  medium chain fatty acids.

10. Is Coconut Oil safe for pregnant women?

Since coconut oil is a food and is a staple for many living in Asia, it is considered safe for anyone. In coconut producing countries it is considered normal and good food for pregnant and lactating women, since it contains lauric acid which is also present in breast milk. However, the cautions of reactions as stated above should be noted. Many in Western countries are used to a low-fat diet, and it is best NOT to begin experimenting with coconut oil while pregnant if your body is not used to it. If, however, you have been consuming coconut oil regularly without any adverse reactions, there is no reason to discontinue while pregnant, and many good reasons to continue consuming it.

11. What is “Extra Virgin Coconut Oil”?

There is no industry standard or independent certification body that distinguishes between "virgin" and "extra-virgin" coconut oil. Please see our complete explanation for the different kinds of coconut oil and how they are produced here.

12. Will cooking with Coconut Oil cause it to become hydrogenated and toxic like hydrogenated oils?

No. Hydrogenation is an industrial process where hydrogen molecules are introduced to the oil to make it solid at room temperatures. It chemically alters the oil and creates harmful trans fatty acids. Cooking with coconut oil does NOT introduce hydrogen into the oil or hydrogenate it. Coconut oil is a very stable oil even at higher temperatures. However, it is best not to cook beyond the smoke point of coconut oil, as this will begin to deteriorate the oil and turn it yellow. Once it has turned dark yellow, the oil should be discarded and no longer used. The smoke point of coconut oil can be increased by combining it with Palm Shortening or Virgin Palm Oil. Both of these oils have a much higher smoke point, and are suitable for high heat, such as deep frying.

13. Where can I buy coconut oil?

The best place to buy coconut oil is online. You will find the best quality and the best deals online. More Info.

14. What is "Liquid Coconut Oil" or "MCT oil"?

"Liquid Coconut Oil" or "MCT oil" are derivatives of coconut oil, and not real coconut oil. They are manufactured oils, and they are byproducts of coconut oil after lauric acid has been removed. Read more here.

Questions about Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil

1. What is Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil?

Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil is our highest quality organic Virgin Coconut Oil. It is hand crafted in small batches by family producers, using the traditional method of coconut oil extraction and production, much has it has been done for thousands of years. It is our premium label organic Virgin Coconut Oil. Read more about our Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil here

2. Is your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil organic?

Yes! We have lived in the community where most of the coconut oil is produced, and we can personally guarantee that the coconuts used to produce our oil are completely organic. In addition, our coconuts and Virgin Coconut Oil producers are certified organic by a third party organization based out of the US (Organic Certifiers) which sends their own independent inspector yearly. We meet strict requirements for organic certification according to USDA/NOP organic standards. Tropical Traditions Virgin Coconut Oil is made from fresh, certified organic coconuts, and the family-based small-scale operation we use to make the Virgin Coconut Oil is also certified organic. Our repackaging facilities in the Philippines and the US are also certified organic by USDA standards. So all phases of our operation from start to finish are certified organic. In addition, we go beyond organic certification standards and implement our own standards, like not using coconuts from heavily populated areas where they are exposed to polluting forces such as diesel and gas fumes from trucks and other vehicles. Most all of our trees are from distant mountain sources far away from the cities.

3. How is Virgin Coconut Oil different from other coconut oils found in stores?

When purchasing coconut oil, one must determine between “virgin” and “refined.” The determining characteristic of virgin coconut oils is that they are made from fresh coconuts, and they have the distinct aroma and taste of coconuts present. Tasteless coconut oils are probably made from copra, not fresh coconuts. There are also some oils that are made from copra that are not fully deodorized and have a taste to them. But these oils are refined also, despite marketing claims. You will be able to taste the difference when comparing with a Virgin Coconut Oil. There are many ways of refining coconut oil made from copra, some more beneficial than others. But virgin coconut oils start out with fresh coconuts, and do not need further refining as their natural antioxidant properties make them very stable oils. For more information about copra-based coconut oils and the different ways to make virgin coconut oils, click here.

4. Since farmers and families make your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil, are sanitary conditions in processing a concern?

No. On the contrary, our Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil receives much more special care and attention than most mass-produced machine-made coconut oil could ever receive. Every family approved to sell us Gold Label standard Virgin Coconut Oil must undergo stringent quality control training and have their facilities inspected. We set standards that they must abide by, such as how old the coconuts can be that are used (24 hours after harvesting), the type of coconuts, the instruments used for processing, like graters and presses, etc. Equipment used to produce the oil is dedicated to Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil production only, and usually provided for by the company. Cement floors are used in the production facilities. In addition, our producers are small family businesses that live in rural areas away from the pollution of the cities, like on Mt. Banahaw. To assure standards are maintained and that only the best quality oil is produced, all producers are organized into groups that are managed by overseers, which in turn are organized into groups that are managed by area managers. So when Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil is delivered to our warehouse for packaging, it has already been inspected 3 times before final inspection at the warehouse prior to packaging into drums or retail packages. Laboratory tests (done on every batch shipped to the US) have continually confirmed that our traditional methods of testing the oil by sight (clarity), smell, and taste result in a very high quality oil.  Moisture levels are consistently below 0.1%, the industry standard for commercial refined coconut oil. This is due to the extreme care that is used from the selection of the coconuts used, to the actual making of the oil, and the complete removal of any moisture. We seriously doubt that any other coconut oil on the market has received such personal care, or could claim to have a higher quality or cleaner handling than our Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil.

5. What is the Lauric Acid content of your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil?

All coconut oils contain large amounts of lauric acid, usually around 50%. The exact percentage can vary due to a variety of reasons, such as coconut variety, maturity at harvest, time of harvest, etc. While our Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil has tested as high as 62%, it does not always test that high, and we do not believe that percentage of lauric acid is necessarily an indicator of a superior coconut oil. All of the medium chain fatty acids in coconut oil are beneficial, and if one has a higher percentage than the other fatty acids, obviously some of the other fatty acids must be lower than normal.

6. Is your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil heated in its processing?

Yes, Tropical Traditions Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil is slightly heated at the end of the processing prior to packaging. This is to ensure that no moisture is present, and to draw all the oil out of the curds (coconut solids) that are formed by the natural oil separation process. Studies now show that traditional coconut oils made with some heat in the process have higher levels of antioxidants. This heat is very low (less than boiling temperatures), and is for a very short duration (10-15 minutes). Commercial coconut oils, by contrast, undergo steam deodorization at temperatures of around 400 degrees. Traditional methods of making coconut oil naturally have always used heat in the process, and we are committed to honoring time-tested traditional methods that have nourished populations in the tropics for thousands of years. Failure to use some heat in the extraction process can result in higher moisture content and shorter shelf life for Virgin Coconut Oils that do not use heat. More info.

7. Is Virgin Coconut Oil destroyed by heat? What about enzymes?

No, coconut oil is NOT destroyed or changed chemically in anyway from its original form by using low heat. Unlike other plant oils, the medium chain fatty acids are very resistant to any change via heat. Even commercial oils heated to a very high temperature have their medium chain fatty acids kept in tact. This makes coconut oil one of the best oils to use in cooking, because it does not break down easily. In addition, studies published in recent years prove that virgin coconut oils produced with heat have higher antioxidant levels than those produced without heat, or simply "cold-pressed." More info.

Some have expressed concern that even low-level heat can destroy enzymes and other beneficial nutrients in coconut oil. But one needs to consider that this is a tropical oil from a tropical plant grown in a very hot climate. The oil inside an airtight coconut still growing high up on a coconut tree will already see temperatures well above 100 degrees F. during its growing season. Laboratory tests done on our Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil, for example, have shown that levels of the polyphenol antioxidants are higher than coconut oils that are produced with (supposedly) no heat - in some cases twice as high. (More info.)

As to enzymes, they are present in the coconut meat but not in the oil. One would not want enzymes in the oil as it would break down the oil and cause it to go rancid. So there is no coconut oil on the market that would contain appreciable amounts of enzymes. You need to eat a coconut fresh off the tree to benefit from plant enzymes. All plant-based oils are separated from the plants they grew in, and do not contain appreciable amounts of enzymes. More info.

It is actually a myth that there are coconut oils on the market that are “live” and “see no heat.” Coconuts are native to the tropics, where temperatures are very hot. Any coconut oil distributed anywhere in North America has “seen heat.” Shipping containers used to ship the coconut oil to the US by sea from the tropics can reach temperatures of over 130 degrees F. If you have a truck deliver coconut oil to your home in the summer time by any of the major carriers, temperatures inside that truck will reach up to 125 degrees F. In the winter time coconut oil turns solid and MUST be heated in order to be repackaged into retail size containers from drums. Tropical Traditions uses large insulated containers that hold many drums and keep a steady temperature of between 90 to 100 degrees F. in the winter time to keep our stored oil liquid so it can be repackaged. It does take longer to liquefy 55 gallon drums this way (a few days) in the winter, but it more closely resembles ambient air temperatures in the tropics. Many other repackagers use electric drum bands to melt the coconut oil more quickly, and temperatures inside the drum become much hotter, closer to boiling temperatures. So any coconut oil you buy will have “seen heat.” But the good news is that coconuts are designed by our Maker to grow and thrive in hot climates, and the oil is not harmed in any way by these low-level heats. In fact, studies now confirm that when some heat is used in the process, these traditionally made coconut oils have higher levels of antioxidants.

8. Is your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil sold under another brand?

No. Tropical Traditions Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil from Mt. Banahaw Health Products Corp. in the Philippines, made the traditional way, is made exclusively for Tropical Traditions and only sold under our brand name. So always look for the Tropical Traditions logo. If it is not on the label, it is not our Virgin Coconut Oil.

9. Are there customer reviews for your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil Brand?

Yes! We have been selling our handcrafted Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil for over 10 years now, and there are thousands of comments and reviews from our customers all over the Interent. You can read and watch some of these Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil reviews here.

Questions about Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil

1. What is Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil?

Tropical Traditions Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil is a high quality machine-made Virgin Coconut Oil. Certified organic fresh coconuts are first dried and then the oil is cold-pressed out by machine. As with other Virgin Coconut Oils, this oil retains the scent and taste of coconuts. Our Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil is made in a central location in the Philippines under strict quality control procedures to produce a consistent product that meets stringent USDA organic certification standards. This high quality Virgin Coconut Oil is NOT made from copra, but from certified organic fresh coconuts that are processed shortly after they are harvested. After the oil is cold-pressed out of the dried coconut meat, no further refining is needed.

2. How is Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil different from your Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil?

Both Tropical Traditions Virgin Coconut Oils are very high quality, certified organic Virgin Coconut Oils. The main difference between the two Virgin Coconut Oils is that the Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil is machine made in larger volumes in a central location, whereas our Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil is handmade in small batches in many locations by farmers and family producers. The Green Label Virgin Coconut Oil is produced by the quick-dry method of cold-pressing the oil out of dried coconut, which results in a higher yield of oil per coconut. The Gold Label Virgin Coconut Oil is made by the wet-milling method, using coconut water, which results in a slightly less yield of oil per coconut, and higher antioxidant levels. For more information about how Virgin Coconut Oils are produced, go here.

Questions about Expeller-Pressed Coconut Oil

1. What is “Expeller-Pressed” Coconut Oil (EPCO)?

Tropical Traditions Expeller Pressed Coconut Oil is a high quality refined organic coconut oil. This oil is processed the “old” way by what is called “physical refining.” The modern way of processing coconut oil is by chemical extraction, using solvent extracts, which produces higher yields and is quicker and less expensive. Tropical Traditions Expeller Pressed Coconut Oil DOES NOT use chemicals or solvent extracts. It is made the “old” way by expeller-pressed mechanical extraction. This oil is also NOT hydrogenated, and contains NO trans fatty acids. It is a very good quality food-grade coconut oil. Tropical Traditions Expeller Pressed Coconut Oil is made from coconuts that have NOT been treated with chemicals or fertilizers. It is 100% natural, and it is also certified organic according to USDA and EU standards. Our Expeller-Pressed coconut oil is high in the medium chain fatty acids, such as Lauric acid. This is the “common” type oil that billions of people in Asia consume on a daily basis. Expeller Pressed Coconut oil is less expensive than Virgin Coconut Oil, and because it goes through a steam deodorizing process the taste is very bland, unlike Virgin Coconut Oil which retains the odor and taste of fresh coconuts. Some people prefer a bland, tasteless oil.

2. Are the Nutrient Benefits of EPCO the same as Virgin Coconut Oil (VCNO)?

As far as the comparison between the Expeller Pressed Coconut Oil (EPCO) and the VCNO, the EPCO still has the medium chain fatty acids/tryglicerides (MCTs) that are the major reason for the nutrient benefits of coconut oil. These are what studies say increase metabolism, support the immune system, etc. What the EPCO is missing is some of the nutrients and anti-oxidant properties that are in VCNO, like Vitamin E, for example (although coconut oil is not a real significant source of vitamin E: Palm oil is better for that.)

The general rule in nutrition is that the closer to nature/natural the better. What we do know, is that many of the studies that have been done on MCTs and report their benefits have been done on regular (non-virgin) coconut oil, or in some cases pure extracted MCT’s taken out of coconut oil. The customer testimonies (which may not be typical) and feedback we have gotten from our VCNO suggests that it is more potent than refined coconut oil (EPCO). But many people are reporting good results from the EPCO as well.

Questions about Coconut Cream Concentrate, Dried Coconut, and Fresh Coconut

1. Does one get the same benefits with Coconut Cream Concentrate ™ as Coconut Oil?

Since Coconut Cream Concentrate (CCC) contains about 70% fat which is pure coconut oil, there are a lot of the same benefits. But one must realize that there is more to the CCC than the pure coconut oil. It is the whole coconut. Therefore, for example, it has sugar (natural), fiber, and protein. So it depends on the needs of the individual and what they expect. CCC will obviously have more carbs than coconut oil, since pure coconut oil has no carbs and no sugar. But CCC has LESS carbs than coconut milk, because it contains all the fiber. CCC has more fiber per gram than grains do, so it is a great way for people to get fiber into their diet, especially if they don’t want to eat grains. CCC is definitely a low-carb food because of the fiber. One complaint of many people on a low-carb diet is that they have occasional intestinal and digestive problems because of the lack of fiber in their diet. So CCC is a great product for them. Please note that CCC is a food, not a cooking oil. For more information, go here.

2. How does one mix the coconut oil that has separated back into the Coconut Cream Concentrate?

3. Can you get the same benefits by eating fresh (or dried) whole coconut?

While whole coconut does contain coconut oil, you would have to eat more by weight to get the equivalent amount of pure coconut oil. Whole coconut contains more than just oil. It would include things like fiber, protein and sugar (natural sugar). Some people could be allergic to whole coconut, and not be allergic to coconut oil, for example, because coconut oil does not contain protein. If you are trying to restrict sugar from your diet, you do have to account for the added sugar in whole coconut as well. As to fresh coconuts, most coconuts you find in U.S. grocery stores are transported many miles and are no longer fresh. A freshly harvested coconut does not have a long shelf life, especially if the outer husk is removed down to the brown shell. Hence, many coconuts in U.S. stores may already be moldy. This is especially true for “young” immature coconuts. The best place to eat fresh, raw coconuts is in tropical climates where they grow, and right after they are harvested. Those outside the tropics might be better off eating dried coconut.

4. What are the differences between coconut milk/cream and Coconut Cream Concentrate™?

Commercial coconut milks and creams are generally sold in cans, or sometimes boxes and tetra packs. The main ingredient in these products is water. If the fat content is 17%, it is called “coconut milk.” If the fat content is 24%, it is called “coconut cream.” But most of what you are purchasing is water. Coconut Cream Concentrate, on the other hand, has NO water, and is pure coconut. Unlike the commercial varieties, it also contains ALL the fiber of the coconut. Pure, dried coconut contains more fiber per gram than even oat bran. This fiber has been stripped out of commercial coconut milks and coconut creams. Also, almost all commercial coconut milks and creams have additives to prevent the water from separating from the coconut oil, and also have sulfites added to keep it white longer. Sometimes these additives are so small, that the FDA does not require them to list them on their labels as ingredients. Coconut Cream Concentrate, however, contains NO additives and NO preservatives at all: it is 100% certified organic natural coconut, made from organic Philippine coconuts grown without pesticides or fertilizers.

5. What temperature is your dried coconut dried at? Is your dried coconut considered “raw”?

For the complete answer to this question, click here.

6. Are coconuts a nut, fruit, or vegetable?

Actually, they can be classified as all three in some form. The meat of the coconut is usually referred to as fruit, and the coconut itself is the nut, or seed, that will reproduce into a coconut palm tree if allowed to sprout and grow, and the oil made from coconuts is classified as a “vegetable oil” in terms of commodity trading.

7. Do you sell young coconuts?

No. Young (immature) coconuts have a very short shelf life before they start turning moldy (a couple of days). Since most of the young coconuts sold in the US are from Asia, they are probably irradiated or preserved in some other fashion to prevent mold growth. The best place to eat young coconuts or drink the water from young coconuts is in tropical places where they are freshly picked from the tree.

8. Do you sell coconut milk?

No. We have never found a packaged coconut milk that meets our high standards. It is a processed product, and freshly made coconut milk will separate and spoil quite easily. The water is heavier than the natural coconut oil, so the water sinks to the bottom and the oil tends to float on top after leaving it sit for a while. Commercially packaged coconut milks must add stabilizers to keep the product from separating, and often these stabilizers are in such small quantities that they are not listed as ingredients on the labels. It could be soy lecithin, or something like guar gum which can cause problems for people who are gluten intolerant. The product then needs to be packaged in air-tight containers to preserve it, and this is often done in metal cans that have aluminum inside, and potentially Bisphenol A (BPA). Since canned coconut milks are over 90% water, you have to be concerned about the source of water that was used in packaging as well. The best coconut milk is one you make fresh yourself! Watch this video to see how easy it is to make your own fresh coconut milk from our dried coconut.

9.Do you sell coconut palm sugar?

No. Tropical Traditions does not sell coconut palm sugar. Most people do not realize that the harvest of coconut palm sugar is not a sustainable practice. The best coconut palm sugars are produced from the sap of the coconut tree by cutting off the coconut flower, which would normally form into a coconut. By sacrificing the coconut flower that would normally become a coconut, one is preventing the coconut palm from reproducing and is sacrificing coconut products in favor of the sap/sugar. Since the popularity of this kind of sugar is rising, it is now also being produced from collecting sap from the trunk of the coconut tree (tuba). This practice also prevents the tree from producing coconuts, and the quality can vary greatly depending on the age of the tree. Coconut trees in the Philippines have already been on the decline for decades, and the coconut oil from coconuts is also now valued as a fuel source in bio-diesel production, resulting in less coconut oil availability as a food source each year. The increase in demand for coconut palm sugar could further result in fewer coconut products, including coconut oil, being available as a food source in the future. Also, since current palm sugar production often comes from older coconut trees that are beyond their prime and no longer able to effectively produce coconuts, fertilizers are commonly used to increase the sugar production. Read more here.

Questions about Pastured Poultry and Cocofeed

1. Do you sell your Cocofeed?

No. We are not a feed company, and feed sources will vary depending on one’s location in the US. We are working to have some feed mills across the country carry the coconut pulp so that they can mix feeds like this for purchase. Once we know of some feed mills carrying the coconut pulp, we will pass those references on.

2. Why do your pastured chickens cost so much compared to other chickens?

A. There is no comparison to chickens raised on pasture and Cocofeed and other commercial chickens. Tropical Traditions spent more than two years in research and development in developing Cocofeed, and our poultry research continues. There are no other chickens on the market we are aware of that are raised on a special formula that contains no soy and something like Cocofeed. We developed the Cocofeed ourselves, and the chickens do contain small amounts of lauric acid as a result.

B. By purchasing our chickens people are directly supporting the farmers who raise them, rather than a large company that runs factory farms producing cheap food. The farmers make a fair profit from this. Unless there is an economic incentive for more people to begin this type of farming, we are left with cheap factory produced chickens because nobody wants to take the time to raise them on pasture.

C. It costs more to purchase this type of a product from the Internet and have it delivered to your home, because of our costs to make this available. If you can find a local farmer willing to raise these types of chickens, you can purchase them directly from the farm for less. We encourage you to support your local farmer! Unfortunately, with the escalating cost of real estate, most people wanting to go into farming have to look at rural land far away from most major population centers. Companies like Tropical Traditions are helping to bridge the gap between urban dwellers and healthy farms in remote areas.

D. Everyone has the freedom of choice. If one does not like the high price of properly grown food, they have the choice to move out into the country and to raise it themselves. When Abraham Lincoln was president of the United States, 48% of the population were farmers, and almost everyone was close to fresh farm sources. Today, less than 5% of the population raises our food. Those unwilling to make the sacrifice to raise their own healthy food should be prepared to pay a premium price to those who do.

Customer Comments:

Excellent shopping experience. These products are delicious. Providing numerous recipes to use with the product on the website is extremely helpful! Shopping.com customer review

I can always count on Tropical Traditions for quality products and service. Bizrate customer review

I bought from Tropical Traditions Canadian raw honey, coconut oil and Organic Maple syrup. I like all the products. I received all the orders sooner than expected. Bizrate customer review

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Organic Private Reserve Soy-free Eggs
4 dozen
Private Reserve
Organic Soy-free Eggs
Retail: $49.50
Now: $34.65
until Thursday July 24th
Maple Syrup
35% OFF!!

Organic Maple Syrup
16 oz.
Organic Maple Syrup
Retail: $27.00
Now: $17.50
until Sunday July 27th
Laundry Detergent
50% OFF!!
Powdered Laundry Detergent
5 pounds
Powdered Laundry Detergent
Retail: $30.00
Now: $15.00
until Sunday July 27th
Oxygen Bleach
50% OFF!!
Osygen Bleach
6 pounds
Oxygen Bleach
Retail: $30.00
Now: $15.00
until Sunday July 27th
Coconut Oil Hair Oils
50% OFF!!
Coconut Oil Hair Oils
8 oz.
Coconut Oil Hair Oils
Retail: $28.00
Now: $14.00
until Sunday July 27th
Coconut Recipes
Individual Strawberry Coconut Rhubarb Crisps
Coconut Coffee Ice Cream Recipe
July 21, 2014
Latest blog post from:
FreeCoconutRecipes.com

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